Rosemarie Gibbons shines the spotlight on an eighteen-year-old Tallaght actress.

Despite the challenges facing them, young Irish creatives are having a moment; perhaps none more exciting than the new class of young Irish actors on the world stage. In 2018, household names like Saoirse Ronan, continue to make waves internationally, while rising stars, such as Barry Keoghan, are beginning to rightfully gain international acclaim in recent projects. All having hailed originally from homegrown productions in Ireland and the UK, young Irish actors are now being considered routinely for bigger productions. One such promising young actor is 18-year-old Jordanne Jones.


“All having hailed originally from homegrown productions in Ireland and the UK, young Irish actors are now being considered routinely for bigger productions.”

Jones has many professional credits under her belt and a strong presence on the film festival circuit in Ireland. Despite her young age, Jones shows great maturity in both her acting and project choices. Her extensive roster includes plenty of unconventional or ‘difficult’ female characters.

Jordanne’s professional debut at age fourteen was in the feature, I Used to Live Here. Her appearance garnered huge critical praise, and the Dublin Film Critics’ Breakthrough Award in 2015. Her television debut at came age fifteen, as a sex worker in the RTE 1916 drama Rebellion.

Jones caught the attention of the wider public in the popular viral video Heartbreak. Heartbreak is a searing piece of social criticism of the forces in Irish society seemingly bigger than ourselves. Jones’ subdued appearance as ‘Youngone’ in the short film which showed a tender portrayal of the harsh realities the character faces. Her acting complements Emmet Kirwan’s spoken-word storytelling to reach an emotional climax that touched many across social media as a ‘realistic’ portrayal of modern life in Ireland for many women, failed by their relationships and the system at large.


“Heartbreak is a searing piece of social criticism of the forces in Irish society seemingly bigger than ourselves”

Jordanne is no stranger to being involved in activism or speaking out on social issues. She is the daughter of Senator Lynn Ruane, former Student Union President of Trinity and a prominent activist. Both Jordanne and her mother were involved in the campaign to repeal the eighth amendment.