Director: Rich Moore and Phil Johnston

Starring: John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, Jane Lynch, Jack McBrayer

Ash Gomez reviews the much-anticipated sequel to Wreck-it Ralph.  

Ralph Breaks the Internet begins six years after its predecessor, Wreck-It Ralph. This film opens with Ralph and Vanellope in their world inside arcade games. Ralph expresses contentment towards their lives, whilst Vanellope admits to finding her game to be repetitive and boring. When Ralph tries to create a new racetrack in order to excite her, it results in the steering wheel on Vanellope’s arcade game breaking. Ralph and Vanellope head off into the unknown world of the internet in order to retrieve the steering wheel from eBay.

“Much like the first film, Ralph Breaks the Internet is quick to explore an interesting, vast world.”

 

Much like the first film, Ralph Breaks the Internet is quick to explore an interesting, vast world. The internet is filled to the brim with visual gags and charming interpretations, such as a large tree housing tweeting birds designated as Twitter. There is a specific focus on viral videos, with references to everything from silly cats to challenge trends to Fortnite dances.

 

Disney makes a conscious decision to reference itself as much as possible. Vanellope visits the Buzzfeed knock-off Oh My Disney, where various characters make quick cameos. There is a focus on the Disney princesses, and they create a very self-aware scene in which they bemoan being rescued by men and constantly wearing ball gowns. It’s a cute scene that would have been more enjoyable had it not been trending incessantly months ago.

“The film revolves around the theme of friendship, emphasising the importance of having space and conflicting desires between friends.”

 

The film revolves around the theme of friendship, emphasising the importance of having space and conflicting desires between friends. This theme can sometimes become overbearing, as the film practically shouts at you the lesson it wants to teach. Compared to the first film, there is a lot less at stake in this story, which makes it difficult to feel invested in the characters. A film about friendship isn’t the same as a film about matters of life and death.

 

My takeaway from the film is that Disney’s apparent influence and monopoly over the internet is terrifying. Which is definitely not the point that the film intended to make.

In a nutshell: Although the film is entertaining, fans of the first movie may be left wanting more.