Adam Lawler tells you how you can take care of yourself on what scientists call the most depressing day of the year. 


THE dark day has already passed, but the struggle faced by students as they begin a new semester is very real. Whether it be down to the shorter days, the lack of money, receiving results, or the trepidation of starting anew.

You may think Blue Monday is based on pseudoscience that trivialises a serious issue, and you may be right; it was originally conceived as a PR stunt to promote holidays to warmer destinations during winter.

Let’s title this first day back to college from Blue Monday to Yellow Monday (based on our college colours) to represent the journey from feeling down to, if not happy, feeling okay.

Get pizza, hot chocolate, or a glass of prosecco (after classes, obvs). Talk to a friend. Push yourself to do something you like, whether that’s something creative or exercising. Get out in nature, or write down your feelings in a journal. You could also break up your day into smaller activities; it will make it feel longer. Your only goal is to take care of yourself.

It’s important to disassociate yourself from the blue feelings, but also to lean into them. It’s okay to feel down. It’s not natural to be happy all the time; you are not a Disney character. It’s when the dark feelings persist that you should talk to someone.