Is heavily branded clothing fashionable?

We’ve all seen Supreme.

The heavy, oblique Futura typeface plastered in red and white on the most bog-standard piece you’ve ever seen, T shirts, hoodies, even bricks. The brand shot into the stratosphere of streetwear with its bold and arguably ironic designs which were quickly adopted by a subculture of style enthusiasts known as Hypebeasts. There was a lot of “hype” around Supreme and other brands of a similar genre; Bape, Off-White and Stussy to name a few. These brands became insanely fashionable in the mid to late 2010s. Streetwear and fashion for the layperson became a popularity measuring contest of who decorated themselves in the most brands.

However, as we begin the next decade of fashion it is becoming exceedingly apparent that personal style is becoming a monolithic presence in our lives. With the forced introspection as well as the isolation brought on by several waves of Covid-19 lockdowns, many began to experiment with their personal style - discovering what they liked to wear and how they liked to wear it.

Tik-Tok is a prime example of this explosion of personal style. It doesn't take much scrolling on your For You Page to find some pseudo-influencer doing street style interviews. Groups of vibrantly dressed people explaining how the pieces they are wearing were either thrifted, handmade, or reworked.

With the forced introspection as well as the isolation brought on by several waves of Covid-19 lockdowns, many began to experiment with their personal style - discovering what they liked to wear and how they liked to wear it.

And it’s a good opportunity to bring exposure to microtrends oversaturating what’s considered “fashionable” to a point where everything is trendy, allowing not only an avenue to explore personal style but an acceptance of an individual's personal style in any setting. This gives immense freedom of expression to anyone who wants to explore their own concept of fashion.

So, is heavily branded clothing fashionable? To answer this, look at some of Supreme’s latest pieces from their Fall/Winter 2022 collection - more specifically their recent collaboration with Jeff Hamilton.

If your style is unbranded basics, then that is just as stylish as the latest Supreme collab. We are at the forefront of a fashion renaissance where fashion isn’t what you wear, it's how you wear it.

The Jeff Hamilton Ridge Street Leather Jacket (credits to Irish designer Seán Boland) is the perfect blend of heavy branding while not overshadowing the personal style of whoever wears it. It features only two logos, one Supreme logo on the front and one on the back. So, if Supreme themselves, the brand built on its loud logos, is toning down the branding of their pieces in favour of more unique statement pieces that speak to personal style then what does that say about the future of heavily branded clothing in the fashion industry?

I would argue that at the end of the day it says little and a lot. In the fashion industry there is a concrete shift away from heavily branded clothing while personal style is about what speaks to you. If your style is unbranded basics, then that’s just as stylish as the latest Supreme collab. We are at the forefront of a fashion renaissance where fashion isn’t what you wear, it's how you wear it.